April 16, 2011

An overview of Croatian costumes, music and dances!


(Another post for the Croatia series of posts I am doing. Stay tuned for other favorite country posts in the future. I am beginning with Croatia because obviously its name is early on in the alphabet, and it is my sister Nikola's favorite country; we also have our room decorated Croatian/Hungarian right now!)


I am pleased to give you a look at the music and costumes of Croatia, through an article that my sister Nikola wrote several years ago! I have enhanced it with corresponding photos depicting the folk instruments and costumes- enjoy!


     Croatia is home to a diversity of musical styles and influences, while at the same time the land is bound together in its own unique characteristics.
The national instrument, the Tamburica, has been played in every region for centuries, beginning as a solo accompaniment for songs and dances, and by the 18oo’s, widening it’s virtuosity to ensembles of thirty or forty musicians- The Duquesne University Tamburitzans are one such group. The members of the tambura family vary greatly in shape and size....



 ....including the mandolin-like prim, and its smaller version: the tiny bisernica, as well as the larger guitar-sized bugarija, celo, and brac. The largest, called the berde, is the size of a cello.
All over the country their irresistible strains conduct lively Kolos, or circle dances, the most popular dance of Croatia which is comprised of much precise and intricate footwork.
Video by Mazzou for promotional purposes.... Duquesne Tamburitzans 2008

Photo by Duquesne Tamburitzans
See similiar ones here
 In the Pannonian plain region of northern Croatia, a Primas, the most skilled musician of his village, plays as town’s people, the women in brightly beaded costumes and leather slippers, whirl in a tightly locked circle. With some differences from region to region a man’s costume typically consists of a long white shirt, which flares out slightly beneath a short black or red vest. This shirt covers a good part of long, loose, white pants, which in turn hide the rims of black boots. Occasionally, a long, brightly hued kerchief is knotted around the neck. This is the forerunner of today’s neck tie which gained popularity after the French adopted it and called it the croat, their word for croat. The northern region of Medimurje displays its riches at festivals and wedding celebrations where men accompanied by female dancers clad in short full skirts,

3 Tamburitzans wear Medimurje costumes,
which are influenced by costumes from neighbouring Hungary.
Photo by Duquesne University Tamburitzans.
embroidered blouses, thick shawls, and tall boots, perform their kolos with much twirling and stamping depicting the influence of their Hungarian neighbors.



Dario Barisic, a graduate from Duquesne University Tamburitzans, and a native of Slavonija, Croatia,
is an amazing musician and vocalist! Visit his group's website!

The Croatia region of Slavonija, a treasure chest of musical jewels, has inspired dozens of beautiful Tamburitza tunes and various styles of songs.














Rolling in and out with the waves of the Adriatic, sea songs from Dalmatia on the coast lend a fresh, carefree musical style to their country.

The customs and art of these areas and many others all come together to paint for us a vivid portrait of Croatia, the land of the Tambura.

All photos are used for promotional purposes- please do not download any of these pictures.
For similiar posts, go Here
or here


Post a Comment